Register-her.com hitting the mark

[dropcap]I[/dropcap]t is time, past time actually, to give you good people an update on register-her.com. And the news is that the site is already exceeding expectations for early performance.

The new web portal, while still awaiting some minor aesthetic changes, is fully functional. Users may now go to the site, enter information on a known false accuser, or other female criminal, add a photo and an information source and submit it for approval.

Our press release is finished and will be going out on Tuesday, provided there is no media consuming event in progress. That should help with promoting the site, especially if some robust news outlet does a story on it. Knock on wood, folks.

On the other front, the actual promise of the website is already being realized.  It was our intent from the beginning that we would create a service for falsely accused men, allowing them to target their accusers for public exposure.  With that being the primary goal, consider the following:

A google search on Andrea Davio-Michaud, who was placed on the registry for a false accusation of rape, returned her listing at the very top of search results. The same is true for Liselle Ellis, false rape accuser. The pattern repeats itself as many of the women listed on the registry come in at or near the top of search results with their listing at register-her.com.  The way Google displays the results is very appealing as well.

There seems to be only two factors that prevent anyone listed on this registry from coming in at the top of returns. The first is in cases where the offender happens to have a very common name, or a name that is also the same as that of a public figure with a strong internet presence.

The other case is when the offender herself already had a strong showing on the internet, either from heightened media coverage of her criminality, which also serves us well, or because they had a strong internet presence for other reasons.

Jessica Valenti is such a case. The return on her thus far is buried on page 3 of returns.  But that will change with time.  The site is already in growth mode.  While we are still an emergent site, we have gained over 500,000 slots on Alexa since launching.  As we market the site and acquire backlinks from more websites, even those on the registry still enjoying some distance from our listing will have that play out on them, Jessica Valenti included.

So live with it.

Not that she is what really matters here. The important thing is that now, any woman making a false allegation is subject to have her misdeed follow her for the rest of her life.  Any prospective employer, or anyone else that invests in Googling her name, will find her listing and undeniable proof of the kind of person she really is.  And in an increasingly web savvy world, this will be the rule much more than the exception.

My prediction is that within 6 months to a year we will have our first litigation, maybe sooner, which is why I have secured an agreement for services with the Randazza Legal Group, a firm that specializes in First Amendment issues and internet law. The attorney I made contact with there is very supportive of the MRM.

We are going to go ahead with this full steam, damn the torpedos, and bring to bear the considerable expertise in making these things happen that AVfM is beginning to amass in earnest.  It is one of many FTSU efforts we are going to undertake, but I am particularly proud of this one.

The legal system does exactly squat about false allegations. Worse, it enables them with neglect and depraved indifference. With time, some hard work and a smidgeon of luck, the day will come that register-her.com become a known entity in the world of finger pointing liars.  It won’t stop all of them, but it will stop some, and it will punish those too stupid or emotionally labile to consider the gravity of their actions.

If they make the mistake of getting caught, it won’t be swept under the rug or fade into the past the way it always has before.  If they tell that lie, they better fucking pray their parents had the good sense to  name them Mother Theresa.

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