Busting Bill's Balls

Comedian Bill Burr is a favorite with many in this crowd, including myself. His shtick is straight up red pill, and he tackles really tough subjects from an unpopular (read: honest) angle, like domestic violence. He does it with intelligence and balls; even showing enough smarts to fully anticipate the anxiety in his audience over the subject matter. He pushes them into a state of dissonance and then smacks them in the face with it. You just have to love that.
He’s the closest living thing we have to George Carlin, only he hasn’t sold out to getting cheap laughs by bashing men. When he does take shots at men, it is usually for the right reasons, not to placate the “clams” in his audience.
I was listening to one of his podcasts yesterday, where he takes on the mentality behind Carrie Underwood’s song, “Before He Cheats,” an ode to excusing vandalism and criminality over a broken heart. In typical Burr style, he tears into the song, and the mentality of women that can rationalize pretty much any kind of behavior if they feel emotionally provoked, especially if a man cheats on them. If you have not heard it, it is well worth the listen.

Like I said, Bill does his thing with this and does it right. We have an entire culture of women that are absolutely convinced they have a right to do anything they want to do, and a culture of men ready to give them more than just a pass. Burr points out in text at the end of his vid that this bit of cuntry music was written by two dudes.
Still, there was something that bugged me about Burr’s monologue. I almost hate to bring it up as much as I respect the guy, and I know what it is like. I have had more than my share of people that come in behind my work with their critiques du jour. Some of it is valid, helpful analysis. Some of it is whiny, nit picking bullshit. I am hoping that my take on this doesn’t fall into the latter.
But here’s the deal. At straight up 9:00 minutes into the video, after ripping these women a complete new asshole for being unrepentant criminals, he challenges women who have been cheated on to find a more functional way handle the situation. And he encourages them to take some responsibility, saying, “You know, rather than looking inward going, you know, maybe I’m a bad judge of character. What sort of qualities am I looking for in somebody, and I’ll date that. I mean, didn’t the fact that the guy had a souped-up four wheel drive truck, didn’t that give it away on any fucking level?”
And I am like, what?
Did I just hear Bill Burr counsel women who justify fucking vandalism as form of petty vengeance that the problem was that they chose men with bad character? What about her character? I mean, how much good is it doing to suggest to scumbag women that they need to pick principled men to date? And by what standard, their cars?
This is where I think Bill, who was on a hell of a roll, skidded right off the tracks into the ditch. It is consistent with the Sugar and Spice mentality about women that even a guy like Bill can default to, and even when he is talking about some disaster of a cunt who slashes tires when she is upset. Did he imagine that before she was cheated on that this woman was some sort of fucking saint?
Look, I get that cheating when in a committed relationship sucks. It never looks good on the person who does it. But that is not to say that I don’t understand it.
If we are talking about a woman capable of feeling justified and righteous in slashing up the leather seats in your car out of anger; of dragging a key full length down the side of a custom paint job and of smashing out your windshield and headlights because you hurt her, what do you think she was like in the day to day life of the relationship before the guy cheated?
Let me answer it for you. She was an insufferable bitch. She was an irresponsible child that justified doing a ton of other outrageous shit whenever her precious feelings steered her in that direction. And she did not have a fucking ounce of remorse for any of it at any time. She was a punishing, emotional terrorist that used payback for every slight or mistake, real or imagined.
She was just the kind of useless bitch that gets cheated on and eventually gets kicked to the curb.
And she needs to find a man of good principle? Uh, no Bill, the loser with the single lightning bolt earring is as good as it gets for her, and yes, he is going to cheat on her. It is his version of smashing up a car, but you won’t likely hear any songs high-fiving that shit on the radio.
She does not need worry about picking a better man until she grows the fuck up and becomes worthy of one – if that is even possible. And even if it is it won’t matter. This kind of woman can pick a really nice, sensible guy, with a sensible car and a sensible job, wearing sensible clothes and that treats her quite well, and it will still only be a matter of time before she figures out that he deserves her doing some really nasty shit to him. And it is only a matter of time before Mr. Sensible leaves, or cheats on her sorry ass, or both.
That is the only understanding of Underwood’s song that there is to be had.
Men, by and large, are completely brainwashed when it comes to women. That is why the crazy shit some women do, instead of being shunned, ends up topping the music charts. Bill Burr makes a living challenging this bullshit and even he went the route of assuming that her problem was that she picked a scumbag, instead of just sticking to the fact that she is one.
I guess that proves the pussy pass lives in all of us, like some sort of recessive trait in men that can make them turn red pills blue if they are not utterly fucking conscious all the time about what, and who, they are dealing with.
There are good women in the world; ones that we can hold to much higher standards than whether or not they smash shit up when they are mad. But it is hard for men to find them and it is not only because they are rare. Mostly it is because most men are too quick with an excuse for what women do. If a guy like Bill Burr can lose focus, any of us can.

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