The Aphrodite and Hera Archetypes: Play vs. Power | Not All Women Are The Same

Since I started making videos about feminism and men’s issues, I’ve had a lot of comments from men proclaiming all women are the same. I understand these men have a reason for feeling the way they do, and I don’t blame them for resenting the women who have caused them a lot of pain and misery. When you keep coming across the same type of woman over and over again, it’s understandable that, after a while, you draw the conclusion all women are exactly the same, wanting the same things and playing the same games.

However, just because life has repeatedly dealt you the same cards, it doesn’t mean those are the only cards out there. It’s true that power-hungry, jealous and cynical women are all around us, but they are just one type out of many – albeit, a common type. They are ubiquitous, but far from the only manifestation of womanhood. In fact, they cause just as much trouble and harm to other types of women as they do to men.

Studying archetypes can help us come to terms with the various colours and shades of personality and behaviour. In this video, I’m focusing on two specific female archetypes to illustrate my point. Thousands of years before the rise of modern psychology, the ancient Greeks had identified the most important forces driving people’s choices and actions. Their gods and goddesses were beautifully poetic representations of the various elements of human nature.

Aphrodite is a lot more than the personification of sex and beauty: she’s a symbol of sensuality, passion and desire, as well as the freedom necessary for the unhindered expression of all these aspects of human nature. Her realm is a vast and colourful world filled with charm, grace, pleasure and joy. She’s only one of countless deities, but she’s one of the most powerful ones.

Tellingly, Hera is the goddess of marriage, but not of love. She is the termagant wife of Zeus, king of the gods, who cheats on her at every opportunity. She’s vengeful, calculating and manipulative. It’s no wonder Peter Wright considers her the goddess of feminism.

These two goddesses represent two female archetypes, which are in stark contrast to each other. You have probably guessed which one is more common…

Watch the full video:

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